It seems like we all have that stray sock awaiting a purpose. Well, the wait is over. In this week’s craft, Kinsley and I make sock animals together – specifically an octopus and a caterpillar. While pretty straightforward and quick to make, this project has had a big impact on the kiddos. Likely due to it being a toy in function, it has resulted in lots of playtime (as well as a big distraction) for Kinsley and her brothers. For us, that’s a huge bonus.

Octopus:

  • 1 sock
  • Rubber bands or string
  • Scrap fabric for the eyes (we used reject socks)
  • Stuffing such as rice, batting, excess fabric, etc.
  • Glue for the eyes (we used hot glue, but other glues would work as well)
  • Optional: Ribbon for a bow tie

Directions:

Step 1: Fill your sock with the stuffing.
Step 2: Squish it towards the top of your sock, and then tie it off.
Step 3: Cut the excess part of your sock into 8 strips, which act as your tentacles.
Step 4: Cut out your eyeballs and pupils, and then glue onto your octopus.
Step 5: Tie a bow tie at the base of the head.

Caterpillar:

  • 1 sock
  • Rubber bands or string
  • Scrap fabric for the eyes (we used reject socks)
  • Stuffing such as rice, batting, excess fabric, etc.
  • Glue for the eyes (we used hot glue, but other glues would work as well)
  • Pipe cleaners or wire to act as your antennae. We used grocery ties.
  • Optional: Ribbon to act as legs

Directions:

Step 1: Fill a small section of your sock with the stuffing
Step 2: Squish it towards the top of your sock, and then tie it off.
Step 3: Repeat steps 1 and 2 until the body of your caterpillar is complete.
Step 4: Cut out your eyeballs and pupils, and then glue onto the face of your caterpillar.
Step 5: Add your antennae by slipping your wire underneath the rubber band. Curl the tips.
Bonus step: Kinsley and I used ribbon to cover up our rubber bands and then left excess to act as its legs!

And that’s it! Happy making! ☺

 

All photos by Hannah Pomante

The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in this blog belong solely to the Spokane Art School Artist-in-Residence, and not necessarily to the Spokane Art School.

Special thanks to Washington Trust Bank for sponsoring this video series.